Public Windows Kernel Programming Class

After a short twitter questionaire, I’m excited to announce a Remote Windows Kernel Programming class to be scheduled for the end of January 2019 (28 to 31).

If you want to learn how to write software drivers for Windows (not hardware, plug & play drivers), including file system mini filters – this is the class for you! You should be comfortable with programming on Windows in user mode (although we’ll discuss some of the finer points of working with the Windows API) and have a basic understanding of Windows OS concepts such as processes, threads and virtual memory.

If you’re interested, send an email to zodiacon@live.com with the title “Windows Kernel Programming Training” with your name, company name (if any), and time zone. I will reply with further details.

Here is the syllabus (not final, but should be close enough):

Windows Kernel Programming

Duration: 4 Days (January 28th to 31st, 2019)
Target Audience: Experienced windows developers, interested in developing kernel mode drivers
Objectives: · Understand the Windows kernel driver programming model

· Write drivers for monitoring processes, threads, registry and some types of objects

· Use documented kernel hooking mechanisms

· Write basic file system mini-filter drivers

Pre Requisites: · At least 1 year of experience working with the Windows API

· Basic understanding of Windows OS concepts such as processes, threads, virtual memory and DLLs

Software requirements: · Windows 10 Pro 64 bit (latest official release)

· Virtual machine (preferable Windows 10 64 bit) using any virtualization technology (for testing and debugging)

· Visual Studio 2017 (any SKU) + latest update

· Windows 10 SDK (latest)

· Windows 10 WDK (latest)

Cost: $1950

Syllabus

  • Module 1: Windows Internals quick overview
    • Processes and threads
    • System architecture
    • User / kernel transitions
    • Virtual memory
    • APIs
    • Objects and handles
    • Summary

 

  • Module 2: The I/O System and Device Drivers
    • I/O System overview
    • Device Drivers
    • The Windows Driver Model (WDM)
    • The Kernel Mode Driver Framework (KMDF)
    • Other device driver models
    • Driver types
    • Software drivers
    • Driver and device objects
    • I/O Processing and Data Flow
    • Accessing files and devices
    • Asynchronous I/O
    • Summary

 

  • Module 3: Kernel programming basics
    • Installing the tools: Visual Studio, SDK, WDK
    • C++ in a kernel driver
    • Creating a driver project
    • Building and deploying
    • The kernel API
    • Strings
    • Linked Lists
    • Kernel Memory Pools
    • The DriverEntry function
    • The Unload routine
    • Installation
    • Summary
    • Lab: create a simple driver; deploy a driver

 

  • Module 4: Building a simple driver
    • Creating a device object
    • Exporting a device name
    • Building a driver client
    • Driver dispatch routines
    • Introduction to I/O Request Packets (IRPs)
    • Completing IRPs
    • Dealing with user space buffers
    • Handling DeviceIoControl calls
    • Testing the driver
    • Debugging the driver
    • Using WinDbg with a virtual machine
    • Summary
    • Lab: open a process for any access; zero driver; debug a driver

 

  • Module 5: Kernel mechanisms
    • Interrupt Request Levels (IRQLs)
    • Interrupts
    • Deferred Procedure Calls (DPCs)
    • Dispatcher objects
    • Thread Synchronization
    • Spin locks
    • Work items
    • Summary

 

  • Module 6: Process and thread monitoring
    • Process creation/destruction callback
    • Specifying process creation status
    • Thread creation/destruction callback
    • Notifying user mode
    • Writing a user mode client
    • User/kernel communication
    • Summary
    • Labs: monitoring process/thread activity; prevent specific processes from running; protecting processes

 

  • Module 7: Object and registry notifications
    • Process/thread object notifications
    • Pre and post callbacks
    • Registry notifications
    • Performance considerations
    • Reporting results to user mode
    • Summary
    • Lab: protect specific process from termination; hiding registry keys; simple registry monitor

 

  • Module 8: File system mini filters
    • File system model
    • Filters vs. mini filters
    • The Filter Manager
    • Filter registration
    • Pre and Post callbacks
    • File name information
    • Contexts
    • File system operations
    • Driver to user mode communication
    • Debugging mini-filters
    • Summary
    • Labs: protect a directory from write; hide a file/directory; prevent file/directory deletion; log file operations

 

Published by

Pavel Yosifovich

Developer, trainer, author and speaker. Loves all things software

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