Windows 10 Desktops vs. Sysinternals Desktops

One of the new Windows 10 features visible to users is the support for additional “Desktops”. It’s now possible to create additional surfaces on which windows can be used. This idea is not new – it has been around in the Linux world for many years (e.g. KDE, Gnome), where users have 4 virtual desktops they can use. The idea is that to prevent clutter, one desktop can be used for web browsing, for example, and another desktop can be used for all dev work, and yet a third desktop could be used for all social / work apps (outlook, WhatsApp, Facebook, whatever).

To create an additional virtual desktop on Windows 10, click on the Task View button on the task bar, and then click the “New Desktop” button marked with a plus sign.

newvirtualdesktop

Now you can switch between desktops by clicking the appropriate desktop button and then launch apps as usual. It’s even possible (by clicking Task View again) to move windows from desktop to desktop, or to request that a window be visible on all desktops.

The Sysinternals tools had a tool called “Desktops” for many years now. It too allows for creation of up to 4 desktops where applications can be launched. The question is – is this Desktops tool the same as the Windows 10 virtual desktops feature? Not quite.

First, some background information. In the kernel object hierarchy under a session object, there are window stations, desktops and other objects. Here’s a diagram summarizing this tree-like relationship:

Sessions

As can be seen in the diagram, a session contains a set of Window Stations. One window station can be interactive, meaning it can receive user input, and is always called winsta0. If there are other window stations, they are non-interactive.

Each window station contains a set of desktops. Each of these desktops can hold windows. So at any given moment, an interactive user can interact with a single desktop under winsta0. Upon logging in, a desktop called “Default” is created and this is where all the normal windows appear. If you click Ctrl+Alt+Del for example, you’ll be transferred to another desktop, called “Winlogon”, that was created by the winlogon process. That’s why your normal windows “disappear” – you have been switched to another desktop where different windows may exist. This switching is done by a documented function – SwitchDesktop.

And here lies the difference between the Windows 10 virtual desktops and the Sysinternals desktops tool. The desktops tool actually creates desktop objects using the CreateDesktop API. In that desktop, it launches Explorer.exe so that a taskbar is created on that desktop – initially the desktop has nothing on it. How can desktops launch a process that by default creates windows in a different desktop? This is possible to do with the normal CreateProcess function by specifying the desktop name in the STARTUPINFO structure’s lpDesktop member. The format is “windowstation\desktop”. So in the desktops tool case, that’s something like “winsta0\Sysinternals Desktop 1”. How do I know the name of the Sysinternals desktop objects? Desktops can be enumerated with the EnumDesktops API. I’ve written a small tool, that enumerates window stations and desktops in the current session. Here’s a sample output when one additional desktop has been created with “desktops”:

desktops1

In the Windows 10 virtual desktops feature, no new desktops are ever created. Win32k.sys just manipulates the visibility of windows and that’s it. Can you guess why? Why doesn’t Window 10 use the CreateDesktop/SwitchDesktop APIs for its virtual desktop feature?

The reason has to do with some limitations that exist on desktop objects. For one, a window (technically a thread) that is bound to a desktop cannot be switched to another; in other words, there is no way to transfer a windows from one desktop to another. This is intentional, because desktops provide some protection. For example, hooks set with SetWindowsHookEx can only be set on the current desktop, so cannot affect other windows in other desktops. The Winlogon desktop, as another example, has a strict security descriptor that prevents non system-level users from accessing that desktop. Otherwise, that desktop could have been tampered with.

The virtual desktops in Windows 10 is not intended for security purposes, but for flexibility and convenience (security always “contradicts” convenience). That’s why it’s possible to move windows between desktops, because there is no real “moving” going on at all. From the kernel’s perspective, everything is still on the same “Default” desktop.

 

 

 

Published by

Pavel Yosifovich

Developer, trainer, author and speaker. Loves all things software

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